Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Travis Mills – Tough as They Come

Travis was one of those kids with a gifted body and an adventurous mind. A high school football legend, he was gregarious, kind, and fun-loving. Although bright, he had no interest in being a scholar. After a short stint at a community college, he joined the Army – a perfect outlet for his considerable energy, drive, and patriotism.

When Travis came home to his wife and daughter from his third tour in Afghanistan, he did so without his arms and legs – one of only five quadruple amputees to survive the Iraq and Afghan wars. Within months he strapped on three and sometimes four prosthetics and got back out in the world. Today, four years removed from what he calls a “bad day at work,” he lives only an hour up the road from me. He has become a motivational speaker and chairs the Travis Mills Foundation.

I meet a lot of inspirational people in my circles. Most of them have MS. I’ve even been called inspirational once or twice. Travis takes that to another level.

He co-authored a book about his life, called Tough as They Come. I read it, or rather listened to him narrate it on my Amazon Echo. Incredible story. Great read.

I wouldn’t characterize myself as Tough as They Come. I’m probably More Resilient Than Average. A new title for my memoir?

My brother, Tom, runs a company, Crooker Construction. He lined up Travis to be the surprise speaker at a companywide meeting. Knowing I was a fan, Tom invited me to the talk, along with my other brother, Andy, and our wives, Diane, Karen, and of course Kim. When I arrived at the venue, Andy and Tom ushered Kim and me into the green room, where Travis was stashed away before his turn at the podium. (That's Travis with the fake legs that work and me with the real legs that don't.)

We hit it off immediately – comparing notes about some of our favorite adaptive devices, like my iBot wheelchair and his prosthetic left arm. As I spoke with him, I could feel the positivity and energy, and it was contagious.

Travis captivated the audience. Of course his story is compelling, but he tells it skillfully, and he uses humor like a pro. At one point he dragged my brother Andy up on stage to play the straight man in one of his good-natured jokes. Throughout the talk, and I expect this to be the case in his everyday life, Travis never uttered a word of self-pity.

He gave me a copy of an award-winning documentary about his life, called Travis, a Soldier’s Story. If you can watch that without shedding a tear … I couldn’t.

I’m not easily impressed by “you can do anything you want if you just put your mind to it” stories. But Travis’s approach is so engaging I can’t help but be moved, and inspired. I recommend Travis’s book and documentary to anyone who needs a little encouragement in their life.

4 comments:

  1. You two are both wonderful examples of the attitude it takes to not just survive but thrive in a life full of roadblocks. And rather than commiserate and try to outdo each other with tales of woe, you both knew that sharing how you both cope was more beneficial. I will definitely look for both his book and documentary.

    And you have been an inspiration to me since I first found your blog, Mitch. Thank you.

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    1. Mary Ellen, thanks for your kind words.

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  2. I resonate on those same wavelengths. We who have that are just plain lucky. I don't know if we were born that way,or it was our family environment or what. I don't even know if a person can work to get it. I just know I've done nothing to "deserve" it and that I am profoundly grateful to wake up each morning and find that my tuning fork is still humming on the same frequency.

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    1. Daphne, you make a good point. I haven't fought demons in order to get to this place of acceptance and peace. It has come naturally to me, and I am grateful for it. as you said – just plain lucky.

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