Monday, December 27, 2010

The iBot’s, and Mitch’s, 15 Seconds of Fame

IMG_1920I think it is supposed to be 15 minutes of fame, according to Andy Warhol, but you take what you can get, right?

A couple of months ago I was contacted by a producer for the History Channel show called Modern Marvels.  They were doing a piece on the Segway (a cousin of the iBot wheelchair that I own) and wanted to license some of my iBot footage

Of course I agreed.  Any publicity for the iBot is welcome.  I'm working with a group of people to try and save the iBot from extinction (click here).  I made my case with the producer that the iBot technology and the iBot story were much more compelling than the Segway technology or the Segway story.  I didn't get anywhere though. 

So the piece recently went live.  Click here to view it.  The Segway story (which is good, just not as good as the iBot story would have been), begins at time 11:35.  My brief appearance (if you look quickly you’ll see Kim too) begins around 14:20.  

So it was cool to be on the History Channel, but I want more.  I want the iBot technology and the iBot human interest story to be told on Nightline, or 60 Minutes, or made into a full length documentary.  The world needs to hear the story of how disabled people were given an incredible gift, only to have it unceremoniously ripped away from them. 

Who do I call?  How do we get this story told?

Monday, December 20, 2010

Merry Disabled Christmas

A christmas tree.Image via WikipediaThis year I endured disabled surgery
And read disabled books
I contributed to a disabled charity
And thwarted disabled crooks

I sailed on a disabled cruise
And piloted my disabled iBot
I sat for disabled interviews
And the good disabled fight, I fought

I starved myself on a disabled diet
And took a disabled shot at a deer
I appreciated nature, and disabled quiet
And quaffed many a disabled beer

I hand-peddled my disabled bike
And hand-drove my disabled van
I spent disabled time with people I like
And I was a loyal, disabled, sports fan

I spent too much money on disabled wheelchair parts
And I made many a disabled friend
I touched a few disabled hearts
And a thousand disabled emails, I did send

It’s not that life is unfair
As you know, I’m not one to complain
You play the cards that are dealt you
If you live in the jungle, you better enjoy the rain

So during this holiday season
I urge you to seek out contentment
Don’t spend time searching for a reason
To feel self-pity, jealousy, or resentment

I’ll end my cryptic verse right here
And offer this sentiment to those most dear
I wish you a Merry Disabled Christmas
And a Happy Disabled New Year!
Enhanced by Zemanta

Sunday, December 12, 2010

CCSVI Alliance- End of Year Appeal

I know that this is a difficult financial time for many folks, but if you are inclined to donate to a charity before the end of the year, please consider the organization that I support, CCSVI Alliance









Since their inception nine months ago, they have worked to become a respected patient resource for the exploration of CCSVI. Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) is a condition characterized by abnormalities in the veins that drain blood from the brain and spinal cord. Research has linked this condition to MS. A pilot treatment study indicated that CCSVI could be corrected for many patients with an angioplasty procedure, and that once corrected, MS symptoms and relapse rates may significantly decrease for many patients.

MS patients such as Susan, who was diagnosed with MS ten years ago at the age of 40:

“The diagnosis was devastating, but at the same time I was relieved to finally learn that the severe vertigo, dizziness, nausea, heat and cold sensitivity, overwhelming fatigue, and numbness from my waist down had a name.” In 2010 Susan learned about CCSVI and decided to have her veins evaluated. She learned she had two areas of stenosis (narrowing) in her left jugular vein and one in her right jugular. Susan had her jugulars and Azygos veins treated. “Alone in my kitchen, finally I tested the waters with my new blood flow. First I tried walking heal to toe, something I have not been able to do for over ten years. I did it with ease!!! I tried balancing on one foot and then the other. No problem! As the days continued I noticed my energy level was greatly improved. I had decreased neck stiffness, was able to turn my head with ease, and my cog fog was gone. I was able to maintain a thought pattern and carry on a conversation. My heat intolerance was also greatly improved. I went outside in 100F weather and didn’t get dizzy or fatigued. Today, four months after treatment, I am now able to accomplish 3-6 daily tasks as opposed to 2-3. The other day I got to the top of the stairs and stopped, realizing that something was different. Then I figured it out. I had run up the stairs, like I used to! The improvements seem to keep on coming. Now, when someone compliments me on how good I look, I can honestly say, “I feel GREAT!” something I haven’t been able to say in over 10 years.”

CCSVI Alliance is working to assist patients like Susan and their families, and support the physicians interested in helping them. The Alliance provides a comprehensive website, http://www.ccsvi.org/, with clear and objective discussions of CCSVI research, diagnosis, and treatment. All medical content has been reviewed by a world-class team of medical professionals. The website also offers resources to assist patients in discussing CCSVI with their medical team, as well as patient perspectives like Susan’s and FAQs. It provides a database of research abstracts, links to all IRB and N.I.H. approved CCSVI clinical trials and a growing catalogue of exclusive video interviews with some of the world’s leading CCSVI scientists and treating physicians.

CCSVI Alliance works with scientists, interventional radiologists, vascular surgeons, and neurologists, to foster a multi-disciplined collaboration. CCSVI Alliance is a member of the Endovascular Forum, http://www.endovascular.org/, where it hosts a CCSVI group for the professional and medical community. Recently, the Alliance was recognized by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) as a valuable, balanced, and accurate resource for people affected by MS, who are seeking information on CCSVI and related treatment. As a result, ccsvi.org is the first CCSVI organization linked to by the NMSS. In January 2011, CCSVI Alliance will make a presentation at the International Society of Endovascular Therapy medical conference, http://www.iset2011.org/.

Through these efforts CCSVI Alliance helps drive an urgent but coordinated effort to advance CCSVI knowledge and unravel the mystery of its link to MS. Help us find out more about CCSVI and its promising treatment, which may be helpful for many MS patients, by contributing today!

Donations may be made at http://www.ccsvi.org/ under the “Donate” tab or by mailing a check payable to “CCSVI Alliance” to:

CCSVI Alliance, Inc.
22 Tommys Path
Northford, CT 06472

Your giving will bring help and hope to people like Susan and others in great need, living with MS. Thank you for your generosity and kindness.

Monday, December 6, 2010

I Was Interviewed About My CCSVI Experience

I was interviewed by a Canadian magazine about my experiences with MS and CCSVI. The overall story starts on page 16. My input is on pages 34 - 36.  Click here to read.