Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Summer Cruise 2017 – Part 4 of 4 – Independence Days

This was billed as the Independence Day cruise. We would dock overnight in Halifax, Nova Scotia for Canada Day, July 1, and we would dock overnight in Boston for America’s Independence Day, July 4. Each city would feature celebrations and fireworks. I love fireworks. Not everyone feels the same way. Can someone please explain that to me?

Halifax

When we pulled into Halifax on the morning of July 1, it was foggy and drizzly, and none too warm. We put on our long pants and light jackets and headed out into the city. What a wonderful surprise Halifax turned out to be. The waterfront had been redeveloped. There were restaurants, stores, brewpubs, condominiums, and boats. Lots of boats.

Not far from the ship, we stumbled upon a rib cookoff, part of the Canada Day celebration. We had never seen such an event on that scale before. These vendors were serious. They displayed their trophies prominently and had huge advertising. As we wandered about, we began to appreciate the love these Canadians felt for their country. What a festive mood they set.

After partaking of butter-dipped corn on the cob and splitting a rack of ribs, Kim and I left the cookoff and found ourselves in a beer garden. We harvested a couple of IPAs, ripe on the vine. Our plan was to continue through the city for the remainder of the day and stay out late for the fireworks. The weather discouraged us, and we returned to the cruise ship by late afternoon.

Around fireworks time, we gathered with others on the ship to view the show from a distance. We were too far away, and the fog was too thick, so, although we enjoyed Halifax during the day, I didn’t scratch my fireworks itch.

Boston

Boston was a whole ‘nother story. We strolled off the ship shortly after lunch and were greeted by sunshine and blue skies. We walked a couple hundred yards to the Silver Line bus stop. As we waited for the bus, we realized we had no cash for fare. Kim spotted an ATM machine and charmed five $20 bills out of it. When the bus pulled up to the stop, we asked the driver if he could break a twenty for us, and he said, “Never mind. You can ride for free today.” And thus began a great day in Boston.

The Silver Line dropped us at South Station, where we met up with Randi and Al, who live in the city. They are the sort of friends who drop everything and entertain us whenever we get to Boston.

The four of us made a quick plan for the day and set out by foot on something called the Greenway, a lovely walking path along on what used to be an inner-city highway. We ended up in one of Kim and my favorite areas of Boston — Quincy Market. There, we enjoyed a cold drink, several talented street performers, and the general positive vibe of Boston on a sunny July 4.

From Quincy Market, we walked a few city blocks to the nearest Red Line station, purchased subway passes with our credit card, and headed across the Charles River to the MIT campus in Cambridge. We wandered around that fine city until our 7:30 reservations at Legal Seafood. We enjoyed a wonderful meal with Randi and Al then mosied toward the Charles River to stake out our spot for the fireworks.

When the first fireworks began, I found myself behind a tree, and could barely see the explosions. There were people all around us, and of course, the good spots were already occupied. Randi, Al, and Kim squirmed their way into decent viewing positions. I dove into the crowd of standing people in my wheelchair — a move that would typically result in the wheelchair occupant being face-to-face with butts not fireworks. Instead, I elevated as high I could in my iBOT and found myself in perfect viewing position.

The fireworks shot off directly in front of us so that the sounds rattled our eardrums and vibrated our breastbones. My itch was thoroughly scratched. At the end of the show, we said our goodbyes to Randi and Al. We headed, along with thousands of other people, to the Kendall station on the Red Line. The city had prepared well for the onslaught of riders, and soon we were on the subway and headed back toward the ship. At 12:13 AM, now on July 5, Kim looked up and noticed the time on the clock inside the subway car. She turned to me and said, “Happy Anniversary,” loud enough for others to hear.

“Oh, look at that,” I replied. “Happy Anniversary to you as well.” We kissed. Everyone in the subway car wished us a happy anniversary. Before we knew it, the Silver Line had dropped us off in front of our ship, exhausted, but in a good way.

Note: the kitchen made us this anniversary cake at the evening meal later that day.

Being part of celebrations in two great cities made this cruise memorable. But doing it as a wheelchair user, someone whose independence has eroded over the years, was extra special. This cruise was my own, or rather our own, Independence Day celebration.

Thanks for reading about our most recent cruise. If you have specific questions about this cruise or disabled travel in general, don’t hesitate to contact me through the comments section of this blog post or by clicking here.

click here for part 1

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Summer Cruise 2017 – Part 3 –The Ship's Crew

The Celebrity Summit holds about 2450 passengers and 1000 crew. We often take the crew for granted. They work seven days a week for weeks on end and become a part of the ship to us. Almost invisible. On this cruise, I made an effort to connect with these individuals.

We sat at the same table for dinner most nights, so we had the same waiter, Adi from Indonesia, a most capable and engaging fellow. At each meal, he would take the four–compartment tray from my OBI dining assistant, cut my food up into the appropriately sized bites, and serve my dinner in the special tray. The first night I dined in my iBOT wheelchair, I showed him how I could rise up on 2 wheels. He was beside himself and asked me to do it again so everyone could see. I was happy to oblige.

Our assistant waiter, or waitress in this case, was known to us only as B, from Thailand. Her twin sister, A, worked a few sections over. To me, their proper names, as indicated on their name tags, were an unpronounceable collection of too many consonants and not enough vowels, so we appreciated the nicknames. B was so friendly and talkative that I got the feeling we sometimes caused her to fall behind, and she would shuffle off in a big hurry, but with smile intact.

There was a talented duo that played different venues each day — her on vocals and him on guitar. During one of their breaks at the Sunset Bar, our favorite outdoor watering hole, I struck up a conversation with the singer.

“I love your voice,” I began.

“Thank you so much,” she replied, flashing the smile she must’ve flashed the last thousand times she had received this compliment.

“Are you here just this week?” I asked.

“No, we have an 8-week contract on this ship.”

I then asked where else in the world the ship would be taking her over the next two months. She said, “A lot of Bermuda.”

She was friendly and receptive to my questions, so I went in for the kill. “Everyone wants to know — are you two a couple?”

“No,” she laughed. “We’ve been friends a long time, and most people assume we are a couple. In fact, the cruise ship provided us with only a single room at first.”

I asked about how difficult it was to score a gig like this, and she explained that cruise ship experience is prime resume material, and that these contracts are highly competitive. This confirmed my impression that the entertainment on cruise ships is top-notch.

One day, I set up my computer at a table in the cafĂ© so I could work on my book and look out at the ocean. I heard someone asking me in a strong Eastern European accent, “Are you making some sort of announcement?”

I turned to see a smiling lady in her 20s, removing dirty dishes from the next table. I said, “Excuse me?”

“You have a microphone. Are you making an announcement?” She giggled.

“No,” I laughed back at her. “I’m unable to type, so I speak to my computer through this microphone.”

Her eyes lit up, and she moved closer. “Are you a writer?”

I’m reluctant to self-identify that way, but she seemed so excited at the prospect that I responded, “Yes, I am.”

She couldn’t contain herself. “I am writer too. I have been published in Ukraine.”

We discussed our various writing projects, and she became intrigued by the premise of my book. She asked if she could send me some sample writing that she had attempted in English, and I let her know I would be more than happy to work with her. I haven’t seen anything yet, but I hope to.

Although the crew is mostly international, the captain of the Celebrity Summit is Kate McCue — the first female American captain of a mega cruise ship. She introduced herself to the passengers at the main theater on the second night of the cruise. At only 37 years old, and looking stunning in her high heels and evening gown, she didn’t fit the stereotype for a ship’s captain.

Midway through the week Kim and I had some problems with the patient lift we had brought along to transfer me from wheelchair to bed, etc. Kim would pump on the lift arm and raise me up in the air. But as soon as she stopped pumping, I would slowly lose altitude. As the week progressed, this problem became more pronounced, to the point where she couldn’t stop pumping at all.

As we approached the port of call in Portland, Maine, where we live, I called my friend Darcy. I asked if I could borrow her patient lift for the remainder of the cruise. She agreed, and we arranged the handoff.

When Kim and I attempted to exit the ship in Portland, with the broken lift in tow, the crew stopped us, even though we had informed them a couple days ahead of time. Kim suggested that I go ahead and exit the ship and wait for her at the bottom of the ramp. I was causing a bit of a traffic jam.

After I had waited for about 20 minutes on the dock, a uniformed employee approached me. She was thin and wore aviator sunglasses. “Can I help you with anything,” she asked. The entire crew was so helpful on this cruise, and I had been asked this question so many times that I almost declined out of habit.

Then I looked down at her name tag and it read, Captain Kate.

“Perhaps there is something you can do. We are trying to get our broken lift off the ship so we can bring a replacement on board, but my wife has been trying to get clearance for almost half an hour now.”

“I’m aware of that request, and I thought it had been taken care of. I'm sorry. Let me see what I can do.”

She turned and looked up the ramp and said, “Is that your wife coming down the ramp with a lift right now?”

“You’re good,” I joked.

As Kim approached us with the broken lift, I introduced her to Captain Kate, and we complemented the Captain on a well-run ship (this incident being the exception).

I texted Darcy’s husband, Tim, and he met us at the ship with the replacement lift. I don’t know what we would’ve done if not for Darcy and Tim’s help.

I’m intrigued by the life that cruise ship workers lead, and I took every opportunity to engage them in conversation. I was not disappointed.

Click here for a sampling of what life is like for workers on a cruise ship.

click here for part 4
click here for part 1




Monday, July 10, 2017

Summer Cruise 2017 – Part 2 – Accessibility Challenges Don't Phase Us

If I had known the wheelchair accessibility shortcomings of the Celebrity Summit, I would not have booked it for a cruise. That would have been unfortunate, however, because we had a great time.

This was our third cruise. We found cruises #1 and #2 to be the most wheelchair accessible vacations we had ever been on. But those were larger and newer ships. So, although we were disappointed with the accessibility of the Summit, we weren’t surprised.

Before I delve into the deficiencies, it’s important to note that one of the primary reasons we chose this cruise itinerary was because it ran out of Bayonne, New Jersey. This meant we didn’t have to fly, which was, itself, an accessibility benefit.

Here are some of the challenges we faced:

No automatic door openers. Unlike the other ships, this one had no open buttons for cabin, cabin bathroom, public restrooms, or toilet stalls within public restrooms. I couldn’t get into or out of our cabin without Kim’s assistance. I couldn’t use the public restrooms without Kim’s assistance.

Tall and uneven thresholds all over the ship. I have a stud installed in the bottom of my wheelchair which couples with a receiver on the floor of my wheelchair van, safely locking me in place. I’ve had this for several months now, and it never bothered me until this trip. As I moved about the ship on that first day, this protrusion became caught up on many of the thresholds.

We called the maintenance department on the ship to help us come up with a solution. After surveying the situation, the maintenance man decided that the stud could be unscrewed, but he asked us to sign a waiver in case he broke something. We signed it. After removing the stud, I still found the thresholds jarring but no longer inaccessible.

Tender boats were not wheelchair accessible. We visited seven different ports. Five of them had docks, but at two ports, Bar Harbor and Newport, the ship had to anchor offshore. Small tender boats were employed to shuttle passengers back and forth between the ship and shore. On my previous cruises, the transition from ship to tender was wheelchair accessible. On the Summit, this was not the case. There were about five steps down into the tender boat.

On the second day of the cruise, Kim and I packed a bag to spend the day on Bar Harbor. We headed down to the deck where people were boarding tender boats. When we arrived at the debarkation point, Kim scoped out the situation and saw the steps. The crew expressed their regrets that the tender was not wheelchair accessible, and I wouldn’t be able to go into Bar Harbor. I explained to them that the iBOT, which I was sitting in at the time, could indeed climb stairs, and so I intended to go to shore.

“We will first have to check with our safety officer,” they explained.

“Fair enough,” I replied. “Let your safety officer know that I’m willing to sign a waiver.”

We decided to eat breakfast and check back later to hear the safety officer’s decision. We went to the breakfast buffet on the 10th floor, filled our plates with tasty morsels, and sat on an outside deck, where we were afforded an amazing view of Bar Harbor.

We had visited this tourist mecca so many times in our lives, but we had never seen the view from this perspective. There were two other large cruise liners in town, and we knew things would be crazy. We soon lost our interest in fighting the crowds in Bar Harbor and decided we would spend the day on the relatively empty ship. By the time we returned to the debarkation station to let them know that we were no longer interested, the crew had changed over, and nobody knew what we are talking about.

A few days later, in Newport, Rhode Island, we gladly stayed on the ship and enjoyed its amenities.

These accessibility disappointments detracted from our enjoyment but didn’t ruin the vacation for us. I’ll consider this a lesson learned and avoid older and smaller cruise ships in the future. In my next blog post, I’ll focus on some of the positives about this vacation, of which there were many.

click here for part 3
click here for Part 1

Saturday, June 24, 2017

2017 Disabled Cruising Again – Part 1

Do not adjust your computer/tablet/phone. You read that correctly. For the second time this year we are cruisin’.

In February, accompanied by my brothers and their wives, Kim and I sailed throughout the Caribbean for seven nights aboard the Celebrity Silhouette. Beginning this week, Kim and I will be sailing by ourselves (along with a few thousand other people) for ten nights on the Celebrity Summit.

We depart from Cape Liberty, New Jersey, which is just across the river from New York City. Note that our fourth stop is Portland, Maine. The terminal is walking distance from our house. I proposed to Kim that she could take advantage of that stop to go home and do a load of laundry. My suggestion was not well received. I can’t figure that woman out.

Anyway, perhaps something interesting will happen on this trip and I will blog about it. Stay tuned.

click here for Part 2

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

The Yin and Yang of MS

I am dependent but not helpless.
I am left behind, but I enjoy time alone.
I am fragile but not weak.
I am embarrassed but not ashamed.
I am disabled, but I'm not hungry, wet, cold, or abused.

I don't walk in the woods, but I still sit by the ocean.
I don't sleep well at night, so I can't stay awake during the day.
I don't travel as much, but people come to me.
I don't work, but I remain relevant.
I don't walk, run, swim, or bike, but I still breathe, swallow, see, and speak.
I don't drive, but I am driven.

I am a born optimist, but I don’t like my chances.
I am a prisoner in this body, but I possess free will.
I am embattled, but I remain content.
I am frightened, but I am loved.
I am frustrated and discouraged, but more often I am amused and intrigued.
I worry about tomorrow, but I live for today.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Eating: A Medical Necessity?

I’ve passed a lot of milestones in my disease progression—cane, crutches, scooter, wheelchair, disability retirement, the involvement of my upper extremities, and more. Recently, I’ve encountered another milestone—feeding myself.

A couple of years ago, Kim began helping me with certain tasks like cutting my steak. Then, with the assistance of my OT Maren and my friend Michael, we devised adapted utensils for me. Those sufficed for quite a while, but not so much anymore. For the past few months, at least half the bites of food I have consumed came from Kim’s hand, not mine.

Back in 2008, when it was time for me to graduate from scooter to wheelchair, I stumbled upon the iBOT, and because of its advanced technology, I felt better about the transition. Now that I need assistance in eating, I found some cool devices to lessen the blow as well.

Liftware Level

I bought one of these spoons, and it’s amazing. Check out the video, below, or click here.

I call it my “Harry Potter” spoon. The Liftware Level costs $200 and is not covered by insurance.

Obi

I bought one of these, and it reminds me of the iBOT. While making my life better, it serves as a conversation piece and a crowd pleaser, not simply a piece of medical equipment. It is battery-powered and mobile enough to take with me to most places where I might dine. Check out the video, below, or click here.


Obi it is expensive – $6000. I filed a medical insurance claim, and it was rejected. Apparently, being able to eat is not a medical necessity. I am filing an appeal, but I'm not sending my Obi back, no matter what.

Thanks go out to my occupational therapist, Maren, for introducing me to both products and helping me integrate them into my life.

Closing Thoughts

Losing the ability to take care of myself is frightening, but technology keeps offering solutions, and I love technology. I am aware, however, that many disabled people can’t afford these expensive devices. We need to find ways to make these adaptations available to everyone. 

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

My Plans for World Domination on World MS Day

Wednesday, May 31, is World MS Day, and I have big plans. Because their readership is so much larger than mine, I’m going to hack into the Living With MS Facebook page operated by Healthline.com and take over their feed for the day. While I have the reins, I will execute my evil plan of engaging readers on a variety of MS topics related to my subtype — primary progressive MS. To initiate the conversations, I’ll share content from Healthline and from my blog, Enjoyingtheride.com

Let’s see how much we can learn from one another. Please share this announcement freely, (except with Healthline.com, I don’t want them to see me coming) so that we can connect with as many folks as possible tomorrow. See you then!


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

When You Have MS, You Can’t Live Without…

A couple of months ago, I received an invitation from Healthline.com to respond to the above prompt. They asked the same question of other MS bloggers. Here is a link to our collective responses.

This is what I wrote:
“With MS, I’ve learned never to say there’s something I can’t live without, because that may be the very thing I lose next. But in the spirit of this question, one thing I would hate to lose would be my voice. I use voice recognition software to write my blog, the book I’m working on, emails, and texts. I use my voice to operate lights, ceiling fans, shades, and televisions. I use my voice to remind my wife that I love her. Given that I’ve already lost all of the function in my legs and much of it in my hands, if I lost my voice, life would become much more difficult.”
I struggled a bit with this assignment. I understand what they were after — describe one aspect of your life that is most important in easing the burden of MS. However, if you take the prompt literally, it asks what aspect of your life you would die without. I spent the last sixteen years ensuring there is nothing in my life that I couldn’t live without, because when you have MS, everything is on the chopping block.

When I was healthy, if you had told me that in the next decade or so I would lose my ability to snowmobile, hunt, golf, type, write, walk, work, or take care of myself in terms of eating, dressing, and grooming, I might’ve fallen into despair.

Indeed, one day I may become overwhelmed and unable to maintain my positivity, but it won’t be the result of losing something I can't live without. It will be that there aren’t enough things to live for, and I’m still a long way from that point.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

My New Wheelchair – Permobil F5 VS

Getting a new wheelchair is not like getting a new hairdo, or a new outfit. It’s way beyond that. Getting a new wheelchair isn’t the same as having your bathroom redone or trading in your car. It’s not like getting a new job or taking a new lover (says the guy who married his high school sweetheart). Those pale in comparison. The best analogy I can come up with is that buying a new wheelchair is like buying a house, if you spend all day, every day, in that house. It’s a big, freaking deal.

Medicare, and therefore most private insurance companies, allows a new power wheelchair every five years, so I needed to choose wisely. I did my research. There have been so many changes in the power wheelchair marketplace in five years’ time. When I think back to my mother’s wheelchairs, beginning in 1970, it blows my mind.

For its time, circa 2012, my Invacare TDX SP wheelchair was quite something. It’s now semi-retired, serving as my emergency backup. I still have my iBOT wheelchair, but I use it sparingly because there are no more parts and no more service available.

Let’s take a look at my new wheelchair, a Permobil F5 VS.

Drawbacks

There are a couple of things I like less about this wheelchair compared to my previous one: 
  • Because the chair is front-wheel-drive, my turning radius is longer, and so my maneuverability is poorer. 
  • This chair weighs about 150 pounds more than the Invacare. In most cases, that’s not an issue, but it can occasionally be. 

Advantages 

  • Leg extension control: In my previous chair, I could elevate my feet. But in doing so the foot pedals would impinge on my legs such that my knees would rise up a few inches, and that made for an uncomfortable position. With this chair, the legs can extend while they raise up. Beautiful thing. 
  • Elevates 14 inches instead of 8: Yes, size matters. That extra 6 inches allows me to sit comfortably at high-top tables in restaurants and brings me closer to eye level when I find myself among a group of standing individuals. Doesn’t hurt when I try to reach something on a high shelf either. 
  • Seatback Recline: In this chair, I can adjust the seatback angle to more comfortable positions, and it even allows me to lean forward for activities like brushing my teeth and eating messy foods. Coupled with raising my legs, this feature allows me to lie flat in the chair as if it were a bed, which I have done more than once already. 
  • Preset modes: There are many actuators in my chair, and I have individual control of them. But I also have common positions I would like to get to without holding down the actuator buttons until each one is in the right position. For example, when I want to nap or watch television, I can push one button so that my tilt, recline, and leg position all go to a preassigned point. In fact, I have four memory positions, and I can change them anytime I like. Big improvement. 
  • Bluetooth for computer and phone: As it gets more difficult for me to control devices like my laptop computer and my cell phone, the more important it is that I can use my wheelchair controls for that purpose. This wheelchair communicates with my computer and phone through Bluetooth. I use the joystick to manipulate the cursor just like I would use a mouse, and I have right and left click buttons that mimic mouse buttons.
  •  IR for A/V equipment: I use voice controls for some of my audio/video controls, but not everything, and sometimes voice control is not ideal. Now I can control all of my A/V equipment using my wheelchair. 
  • Electronic anterior and posterior tilt: This means I can tilt my seat, as opposed to my seatback, forward or backward. Again, this helps with activities like brushing my teeth and eating messy foods, as well as getting several comfortable, reclined positions. I also make use of a certain anterior tilt memorized position whenever I empty my bladder during the day. I'm practically standing up and peeing again. 
  • Cell phone plug-in: In my previous chair, I had a cell phone mount, but in this chair, the cell phone is plugged into the wheelchair battery, and I never worry about charging. Imagine if you had a cell phone you never had to charge. 
  • 7.5 mph: My old chair topped out at 5 mph. This one goes 50% faster. That makes a huge difference in the wide open spaces like parking lots and my jaunt to physical therapy twice a week. 
  • Standing mode: This is what makes the Permobil F5 VS the Cadillac of the power wheelchair world (I guess that’s a pretty outdated term for high quality, isn’t it?). My iBOT elevates me up on two wheels. My Invacare could elevate me 8 inches. My new chair elevates me, but if I prefer, it also stands me up. I put a padded bar just below my knees and another one across my chest, push a button, and I am standing. It’s a good position to be in for so many activities, but most importantly, by standing a little bit each day, I improve my health—circulation, respiration, digestion, joint health. Standing brings a whole new benefit to physical therapy. Doing my exercises in a standing position allows so much more range of motion. 

What I wish it had

I wish I could move along at normal walking speed at full elevate. I understand not allowing normal walking speed, about 3.5 mph, in standing mode, but I think they could allow it in elevate mode. I’m working on them. They’re not budging, yet.

Final Thoughts

In my yet unpublished book, on page 169, I write: 
There is no relationship between human and machine more intimate than that between a wheelchair and its user. The chair serves not only the function of legs, but also couch, recliner, dining room chair, car seat, chaise lounge, dog walker, coat rack, drink holder, getaway vehicle, and shopping cart. It is, therefore, ironic that the customary term for such a condition is confined to a wheelchair, when, in fact, the more accurate term is enabled by a wheelchair
Now, knowing what I do, I need a few items to this list. I’ll never finish the damn book.

Thanks go to my occupational therapists, Michele and Maren, my physical therapist, Claudia, my primary care physician, Dr. Freedman, the folks at Black Bear Medical including Don and Wendy, and the team at Permobil led by the incomparable Lisa. Couldn’t have done it without you.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

The Art of Peeing in Bed (on Purpose)

As significantly disabled people go, I am the exception. My bladder still works. To take advantage of that, however, requires ingenuity.

During the day, I pee into little containers and empty them into the nearest toilet. Straightforward stuff. But liquids have this unfortunate tendency to flow downhill, and that presents a challenge when I’m lying down in bed.

When it became too difficult for me to sit up in bed and use a container, much like I do in my wheelchair, the difficulties began. For a few years, I had the strength and dexterity to roll over on my side. Once I’m on my side, there’s room for the container, and everything flows downhill. Piece of cake.

As my disease progressed, it became too difficult for me to roll myself over, so I had to wake Kim to assist me. Not straightforward. Not a piece of cake. This interrupted Kim’s sleep, one or two times per night, and it was an imperfect process. She had to roll me over and stick a pillow behind me before I rolled back. Our success rate was less than 100%.

This is where ingenuity came into play. As I searched the internet for a better device for Kim to stick behind me after rolling me over, I happened upon this inflatable pillow:

This product is typically placed between the mattress and box spring, and is used to elevate the head of someone's bed. Here is the description:
The Contour Products Mattress Genie Bed Wedge is an adjustable alternative to foam bed wedges, and an affordable alternative to hospital beds. With just the touch of a button on the hand held remote control, you can raise the head of your bed up to 26" high. When not in use, simply press "flat" and the air bladder will disappear from view, eliminating the issue of storage for a bulky foam bed wedge. 
I began to wonder. What if I turned this pillow lengthwise and laid it underneath one side of my fitted sheet? Because it inflates and deflates rapidly, could it serve the function of rolling me over in bed so I could pee in the middle of the night without Kim’s assistance?

I ordered the device, and we tried it out. It worked—spectacularly. Kim and I both sleep better. I no longer need to dehydrate myself in the evening. I had begun to fear that, although my bladder function is near-normal, I would have to resort to intrusive devices simply because liquids like to flow downhill. Now, I’ve put that thought off for a while longer.

Yes, I realize this example is more evidence of how much simpler men’s lives are than women’s, even in the disabled community.

Although I couldn’t avoid the words pee, bladder, and toilet in this blog post, I didn’t use any unpleasant words like penis, urine, urinal, catheter, or New York  Yankees. You’re welcome.